10 interesting facts about Central Australia

Australia is a massive country with about the same land mass as the United States. With a population of around 25 million people and 85% living within 50km of the coast, a large portion of the country remains uninhabited, primarily in the centre region. Although the number of people may be sparse in Central Australia,...
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Australia is a massive country with about the same land mass as the United States. With a population of around 25 million people and 85% living within 50km of the coast, a large portion of the country remains uninhabited, primarily in the centre region. Although the number of people may be sparse in Central Australia, it is still home to numerous attractions and animals that draw in tourists from all around the globe!

  1. Throughout most of the year, the outback has a reputation for being scorching hot and boasts temperatures of over 40 degrees! Some people might not realise that winter can be quite extreme with temperatures dropping below -10.
  2. Alice Springs is somewhat of an oasis for internet and cafes in an otherwise sea of red sand and rock. Located in the centre of the continent, Alice Springs is the only major town in an area roughly 700,000 km2
  3. Uluru, also known as Ayers Rock is the second largest Monolith in the world at 348 metres! The rock stands taller than the Statue of Liberty, the Great Pyramid, and The Eiffel Tower.
  4. The Outback has the only known fossilised dinosaur stampede in the world. Experts say the stampede was caused by a larger dinosaur chasing down their prey in a group consisting of around 150 two-legged dinosaurs!
  5. Surprising to most people who visit Central Australia, the camel is the most seen animal! Camels are not native to Australia and were brought here from India and Palestine in the 1840s. With over 1 million now roaming Australia, it is the largest number of purebred Camels in the world.
  6. Although the official language of Australia is English, there are over 150 Indigenous languages spoken across Central Australia.
  7. Coober Pedy is not only famous for opals but also for its underground hotels. If you visit, stay at least one night underground – there are plenty of options from camping to hotels.
  8. Thorny devils are native to the outback and curiously cannot drink water with their mouths. Their entire mouth has evolved specifically to feed on small ants that share their habitat. Channels between the animals’ scales draw moisture towards their mouths, where they squeeze it inside in small gulps. This means the thorny devil can drink water just by standing in a puddle!
  9. Most people think that the Outback is a dry desert but it receives a surprising amount of rain, from 150mm in the arid areas to 500mm in semi-tropical parts.
  10. The dingo fence built in 1885 stretches from South Australia through New South Wales to Queensland. The fence is one of the longest structures in the world at 5614 km, only the Great Wall of China is longer!

If you’d like to grasp the true beauty and origins of Australia, the outback is a fantastic educational destination! Contact our program specialists to start organising your Central Australian tour today.

 

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