Engage students with STEM in the real world

Advances in STEM are creating new industries and disrupting existing ones. Educators need to ensure students are engaged in these learning areas, as the demand for scientists, researchers, engineers and other STEM related professionals is growing faster than the supply can match. It’s important that students have the chance to cultivate an interest in STEM...
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Advances in STEM are creating new industries and disrupting existing ones. Educators need to ensure students are engaged in these learning areas, as the demand for scientists, researchers, engineers and other STEM related professionals is growing faster than the supply can match. It’s important that students have the chance to cultivate an interest in STEM and understand its application in the real world. Research has also shown that students who study STEM have improved cognitive abilities and are better able to respond to the changing needs of the workforce.

A STEM tour gives students a firsthand understanding of the impact that STEM has in the real world. Students are inspired through various interactive learning experiences. They will experience the wonders of STEM and see the many exciting career possibilities in these cutting edge industries.

These STEM learning experiences will inspire your students:

CERN – Switzerland

The European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) is the largest particle physics laboratory in the world. CERN is widely known for the large hadron collider, which smashes subatomic particles together at near the speed of light, to better understand the components of matter.

Established in 1954, CERN has a long history of science and innovation, most notably being the birthplace of the World Wide Web. During a guided tour, students will learn how CERN united European scientists at the end of WWII. Students will learn about CERN’s quest of ‘Science for Peace’ as they are surrounded by the scientific advances CERN has achieved. This tour of CERN will challenge students to question the nature of the world around them.

Royal Society of London – London

The Royal Society of London is one of the first scientific institutions. It has played a pivotal role in fundamental scientific discoveries throughout history, which still today serve as the backbone of modern science. Scientists at the Royal Society continue to make important scientific contributions, and students will be introduced to the work conducted by its members past and present.

Students will listen to stories and review original artefacts of distinguished Royal Society fellows, including Isaac Newton, Benjamin Franklin, Charles Darwin and more.

Volkswagen Production Plant – Shanghai

This guided tour takes students through the auto manufacturing base with the largest output of cars in China, the Volkswagen Production Plant. Students will first learn about the history of the plant, as the first ever joint venture of car manufacturing in China. They progress through the assembly workshop and witness industrial robots piece together cars from raw materials on the production line.

Students will see robotics and engineering in action! They are given a glimpse into the many aspects that play a role in an efficient assembly line, including robots, skilled workers and effective management.

LENOVO Factory – Shanghai

Learn how smartphones are made at the LENOVO factory. Being one of the world’s leading personal technology companies, the LENOVO factory in Shanghai is a major research and manufacturing centre, with roughly 1000 employees.

Students will learn about technical manufacturing as they watch various components attached to smartphone motherboards on the assembly floor. During a guided tour, students will come to understand the importance of testing in product development.

Inspire your students! Talk to our STEM specialist today.

Our STEM specialist Jason is available to discuss your school needs and how a STEM tour can support your classroom learning.

Contact him on 1800 331 050 or info@worldstrides.com.au.

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